13 December 2017

Saint Lucy's Day


Heleen (the Netherlands) has sent me this postcard from one of my favourite illustrators: Inge Löök (see my album!). It shows the procession of Saint Lucy's Day. That is what the Wikipedia  says about:
In Scandinavia, where Saint Lucy is called Santa Lucia in Norwegian and Sankta Lucia in Swedish, she is represented as a lady in a white dress (a symbol of a Christian's white baptismal robe) and red sash (symbolizing the blood of her martyrdom) with a crown or wreath of candles on her head. In Norway, Sweden and Swedish-speaking regions of Finland, as songs are sung, girls dressed as Saint Lucy carry cookies and saffron buns in procession, which "symbolizes bringing the light of Christianity throughout world darkness."
In my country there are also some traditions associated to Saint Lucy. Maybe one of the most known is the Fira de Santa Llúcia, a Christmas street fair held next to the cathedral in Barcelona since 1786. (In case you are interested: 12 curious facts about the Santa Llúcia Fair).

Update: I added this post to Maria's Postcards for the Weekend. This week the topic is December Holidays.

12 comments:

  1. Hi Eva, This is a neat card. I love the way you and Heleen exchange cards and then I end up seeing them on your respective blogs. That is just cool! Thanks for sharing and for your kind comments on my blog as well.

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    1. I enjoy a lot these exchanges, and also sharing them here. Thanks for visiting!

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    2. So do I, enjoy to exchange and share cards (wish I had sufgicient time to blog all cards - you/Eva sent so many interesting ones!)

      Thank you for your kind words, John.

      And Eva, I am happily surprised that this card arrived in time for Saint Lucia's day!
      And thank you for the information about the Santa Llúcia celebrations!

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    3. Actually, it arrived on 30th November (!). I have replied, but the letter is still to be sent.

      We associate Santa Llúcia with buying new figurines for the nativity scene.

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    4. I only saw a St Lucia celebration on TV this year (here in Sweden). I put up my decorations gradually during Advent, and around Lucia I usually get my nativity scene out, too :)

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    5. In Spain, the tradition says that the nativity scene must be ready on 8th December (and you let it until 2 February).

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  2. Dans le livre "Fêtes de noël et nouvel an autour du monde",il est écrit:"Vierge et martyre.Originaire de Syracuse ,elle vécut au quatrième siècle.L’extrême beauté de ses yeux séduit un jeune païen qui éconduit ,de rage la fit arrêter .On lui arracha les yeux .C'est ainsi qu'on lui a prêté depuis la faculté de guérir toutes les maladies des yeux .Son nom Lucie du latin lux ,lucis signifie lumière .En Suède ,où les nuits sont plus longues que nos jours ,le culte de sainte Lucie donna lieu à une grande fête nationale .Ce jour-là dans toute la suède,on fête le jour le plus court et le plus sombre de l'année et semblerait-il la date de l'ancien solstice d'hiver :c'est la fête de la lumière .

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    1. J'ai voulu éviter la pire partie, tu voix...

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  3. Interesting I really enjoyed this time

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    1. Many thanks for your visit and your comment!

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  4. Hi Eva, thank you for sharing this St. Lucy postcard. It's such a nice illustration! Thank you as well for the link for the 12 Curious Facts. I wish you and your loved ones, family, and friends happy holidays!

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    1. Thanks, Maria. Same to you and yours.

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Thank you for coming. All your comments make me extremely happy.