15 April 2018

Women on Stamps | Illness

This semipostal stamp was issued by USPS on 30 November 2017 in order to help to raise funds to fight Alzheimer's disease. The artwork is an illustration that first appeared on the 42-cents Alzheimer's Awareness stamp issued on 2008. (See here a better picture, not covered by the postmark ink.)



The 8-cents Prevent Drug Abuse was issued by USPS in 1971. Postmaster General Winton M. Blount said at the  dedication ceremonies: "... is not, in fact, a commemorative stamp at all. It is, rather a warning, a plea for help and a call to the American people to take every step to lift up those who have fallen under the use of drugs, and to strike down those who profit from the misery of others..."


Happily, we can find other women on stamps, fighting against illnesses and bad conditions. For instance:

Mary Edwards Walker (1832 – 1919) was an American abolitionist, prohibitionist, prisoner of war and Civil War surgeon. She was the first and only woman to ever receive the Medal of Honor. After the war, she was a writer and lecturer supporting the women's suffrage movement until her death. The stamp honouring her was issued on 28 January 1998.


Clara Louise Maass (1876 – 1901) was an American nurse who died as a result of volunteering for medical experiments to study yellow fever. This stamp was issued on 18 August 1976.


Virginia Apgar (1909 – 1974) was an American obstetrical anesthesiologist. She was a leader in the fields of anesthesiology and teratology, and introduced obstetrical considerations to the established field of neonatology. To the public she is best known as the inventor of the Apgar score, a way to quickly assess the health of newborn children immediately after birth.

In 1994, she was honoured by the USPS with this 20¢ Great Americans series postage stamp.

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For the new edition of Sunday Stamps-II A to Z, I have decided to show some of the stamps I have got on letters and postcards, related to one topic: women. This is the post for the letter I.

More women on stamps.

17 comments:

  1. Another unexpected word for your series of Women on Sunday Stamps. I did not know that an Alzheimers stamp had been issued in the past.

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  2. This is a beautiful collection and an original idea for the letter i!
    The anti-drugs stamp reminds me of the book cover of the German Christiane F., who wrote a book about her life, starting to be addicted to heroine in the same 70ies, a book (translated into Dutch) all of us read in our teens. And I happened to read an interview with her last week!

    Of course I love all of these stamps, and the Apgar score still is used nowadays.

    Thank you for another great contribution!

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    1. Thanks, Heleen! :)
      Although the stamp about drugs doesn't belongs exactly to the subject, I love its design. Very 70s!

      I think I read that book as a teenager, too. But at that time I didn't know it was a real story :|

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    2. The stamp does belong to the theme, as addiction is recognized as being an illness (or disease? There is difference in the meaning of both English words, in Dutch we name both 'illness' and 'disease' 'ziekte', and addiction-illness/disease is 'verslavingsziekte')

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    3. I guess we would differentiate between illness/disease and addiction in Catalan and Spanish. At least, in everyday language.

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  3. fine collection of stamps honouring women. Do you know whether Mother Teresa has ever appeared on a stamp?

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    1. I haven't got any stamp depicting Mother Theresa. I've seen them on the net, at least from the USA, Australia and the Vatican. I do believe that more countries have issued stamps dedicated to her.

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    2. Croatia also issued a Mother Teresa stamp :)I believe Macedonia as well

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    3. The USA issued one in 2010.

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    4. La France a émis un timbre sur mère Thérésa en 2010 aussi.

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  4. i don't believe I've ever seen a stamp about drug abuse, great find

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    1. I guess it's from a time that postal authorities bothered more to issue this sort of general health campaigns.

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  5. I like how the selection you chose spans from youth to elderly. Nice addition to today’s posts!

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    1. Some of the stamps sent by you... ;D

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  6. The first two are a fine way to raise awareness. More wonderful women, the breadth of experience and causes of Mary Walker are astounding and inspiring.

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    1. I love to get these stamps that allows me to discover such amazing facts.

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Thank you for coming. All your comments make me extremely happy.