22 April 2018

Women on Stamps | Jebb (and Josephine)

Eglantyne Jebb (1876 – 1928) was a British social reformer that, as the stamps says, "campaigned for the rights and welfare of children". She founded the Save the Children organization.



Josephine Butler (1828 – 1906) was an English feminist and social reformer in the Victorian era. She campaigned for women's suffrage, the right of women to better education, the end of coverture in British law, the abolition of child prostitution, and an end to human trafficking of young women and children into European prostitution.

These stamps were issued on 15 March 2016, as part of a set of six stamps to honour some of Britain’s greatest humanitarians and their achievements, entitled British Humanitarians. See all the stamps here.

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For the new edition of Sunday Stamps-II A to Z, I have decided to show some of the stamps I have got on letters and postcards, related to one topic: women. This is the post for the letter J.

More women on stamps.

20 comments:

  1. I'm ashamed to say that I have these stamps but still did not recognise the women's names.

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    1. Neither I knew that she was the founder of Save the children.

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  2. these women definitely deserve to be commemorated on stamps - in a way the struggle is still very much real

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    1. That's the sad truth.

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  3. Two more women I had no knowledge of!

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  4. Great women to be featured on stamps! Unfortunately, as agi said, the struggle is still real...

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    1. Change is too slow in our world.

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  5. I think it's so neat that stamps are used to commemorate people. I like the idea of a little piece of history on a letter you receive.

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    1. Every time I get a stamp, I feel curious about the subject on the stamp. It's a funny way to learn, isn't it?

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  6. Hi Eva, I commend you on posting stamps that celebrate women. I had to look up and read about Coverture. Wikipedia says, “Coverture arises from the legal fiction that a husband and wife are one person.” Sometimes it seems like the law creates as many problems as it solves. I have to wonder if someday in the future people will look back on this period of time and wonder what took humanity so long to put men and women on equal footing? Thanks, as always, for sharing.

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    1. I also had to look up the concept. Unhappily, it's still so much to do,regarding women and men equality of rights... :(

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    2. Also I had to look it up, and to my not-so-surprise I even saw on wikipedia (the best place to look for translations) that there is no translation for it. Despite of the lack of a Dutch word for it, it was usance here as well, women being regarded as a kind of 'unintelligent property' of men, once married. Until about half a century ago women had to quit working when they married, even if there were no babies yet born. My mom told me that one of the reasons to choose my father to marry (in 1962) was because he thought it okay when she would keep on working after their wedding.
      Fortunately a lot has changed, but still there is a lot of things to achieve in the present time...

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    3. I don't know the word in my language (it's a technical word in law, I guess), but the concept isn't so far away. I'm surprised every time I read about the matter. A lot of equality laws are a lot younger than me, in Europe!

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  7. Thanks for sharing these stamps. I'm always happy to learn about women who made a difference as these two obviously did.

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    1. Me too. I'd like to see more stamps depicting women!

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  8. Nice to see that the set had an equal number of male and female.

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    1. I think that Royal Mail is doing a good job here.

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Thank you for coming. All your comments make me extremely happy.