26 April 2017

#AtoZChallenge | V is for Vintage

75 To Margarita in Paris, November 1903:
"Manolo passed his exams very well and today it is
Aberto's turn. A tender kiss, your Mamilla"

Dearest Margarita: An Edwardian Love Story in Postcards is both a book and a box containing a collection of 100 postcards. It tells the story of a forbidden love affair between Margarita Johnson (a wealthy young Cuban girl, born in 1880) and Charles Lumb. They were forced by circumstances to conduct their romance in secret, across continents. I have received some postcards of this collection, from Laura (the UK).
At the time of this love affair, 1900-1906, a craze for postcards was sweeping through Europe. It became the fashion to send and receive cards from friends -in most places there were three postal services a day. The law at the time prevented the sender from writing a message on the address side, so phrases were inserted around the picture side of the card. Cards were often kept in elaborate personalised albums and this was where Margarita kept hers. Over the six-year period the cards came in from family, friends and Charles, who wrote from America, England and Europe - wherever he was on his travels.

92 Bathers at Dieppe. 'Anticipating the pleasure of the coming
month. Yours ever, C.' June 1905

54 Napoleon, a card from Raul von Schroeder,
July 1903.

Can you imagine that someone, in the future, would do that with your love story?


43 comments:

  1. A love story on postcards - isn't that perfect!

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    1. No doubt it is!

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    2. Sure it is! Romantic, too.

      And no, here alas no personal romantic love stories on postcards.. :-)

      Concerning old postcards: I read that the way the postage stamp was sticked to the card (for instance in a 45 degrees angle or across), had a (secret) meaning, too!

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    3. I have read that too, and even I found several examples on the net. I guess it wasn't so secret Maybe secret for their parents, but not for the recipients of the letters... Otherwise it wouldn't had worked! I wonder what that people (Jane Austen's time) would think of the way we stick the stamps on some envelopes, and the quantity of them ;-)

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  2. This is simply beautiful! and moving.

    Nilanjana
    Madly-in-Verse

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    1. I am glad that you like it. I find these postcards really nice, and I would like to read the rest.

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  3. Fascinating that this was conducted by postcard - quite an open affair in one way.

    Phillip | V is for Vodka

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    1. Probably they keep the most interesting parts for letters sent inside envelopes. Anyway, the postal workers don't have the time to read :)

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  4. Three posta services a day; now we are lucky if we get one. Romance has gone it seems.

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    1. I had noticed that, too. Here I have... the services that the post office decide every day!

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  5. I find the idea romantic... and a little strange, because if you don't put your cards in envelopes, everyone can read them. Wonder what the postmen thought... :D

    The Multicolored Diary: WTF - Weird Things in Folktales

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    1. As I wrote to Phillip, maybe the letters were more substantial that postcards. But imagine someone living a secret love affair... even a postcard saying "the weather is nice in the island" is uberimportant and superlovely!

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  6. Yes, postcards seem a poor way to conduct a secret affair. But I've received a few romantic cards in my day. All my friends and family know I love postcards, so they know sending one is a gesture I'll appreciate.
    Alphabet of Relief Block Printmakers

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    1. I don't receive love cards in the classical sense. But every letter is, in a way, a love letter, isn't it?

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  7. I have picked up a few vintage postcards because of the messages on them. I think it is interesting to have a glimpse into a different time. I would think it is not a great way to send secret messages though.

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    1. Maybe they wrote using a secret code...

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  8. Ah! that's interesting...stories from a different time and place!

    Shubhangi @ The Little Princess

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    1. It is like reading a novel, isn't it? Just it is a true story.

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  9. Such a treasure "Dear Margarita" must be. Would love to read.
    Oh! the romance of such a love affair -- the agonizing wait for the next post--the excitement of scribbling notes--swoon-worthy.
    V is for Ventriloquist

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    1. Concerning mail, and especially "swoon-worthy" love letters, I think that waiting is the worse and the better part.

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  10. A postcard love affair. Who'd have thought?! I love this. So much story behind what's written on the postcards too.

    I only have a moment of Internet, so after this vacation, I have to go back and get caught up. This is such fun stuff, Eva, thanks!

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    1. I'll be happy to see you around here again. I hope you come back from your almost-Internet-free holidays... alive.

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  11. Wow didn't know the love for post cards started started between 1900's-1906. I still send postcards. My friends absolutely love it when I send them a card in the mail. It's so personal.

    http://theglobaldig.blogspot.com/2017/04/v-is-for-voices-atozchallenge-via.html

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    1. I think the love for postcards started sooner, but in that time they became more and more popular (maybe the postage became cheaper). It's amazing that we continue to send and enjoy them, isn't it?

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  12. What an interesting fact that messages were not allowed on the address side.

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    1. I thought so, how curious to write on the obverse!

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  13. I cannot imagine what they'd do with my love story, no postcards, maybe 2 letters. They will, no doubt get it all wrong!
    Finding Eliza

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    1. Imagine they use your letters for the historical research 100 years later...

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  14. Eva, This is such an interesting post. The cards are beautiful and the love story is so romantic. I'd love to read them all.

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  15. I'm still trying to wrap my brain around a secret love story on postcards! How do you do that when there's not even an envelope?! lol Amazing. :)

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    1. Well, they also used envelopes. And anyway, probably the postal workers didn't know their language...

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  16. Vintage! Love 'em. Great story. You can tell a lot in a small space. I have a stack of vintage post cards and photos I like to use in collage & other art.
    Weights & Measures

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    1. Great! I love to see ,ail-related art, but I confess that I am myself unable to destroy a postcard or a stamp in order to collage them. Well, so far. Maybe I'll try one day!

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  17. Ooooh.
    The excitement surrounding a not-so-secret vintage postcard love affair...love this concept!
    Writer In Transit

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    1. :D

      Michelle, I'm sorry about this: I don't know what happens, but there is noway can read your blog. I've tried with different browsers. am I the only having this problem? It doesn't happen with any other site!

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  18. Well, can't say the idea of someone in the future publishing my love letters as a book isn't creepy. But then I'll never know, and people in the future might be fascinated withit as we are with this book you present here.

    I also liked the tidbits about postcards history too :-)

    @JazzFeathers
    The Old Shelter - 1940s Film Noir

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    1. I agree.We would never know, so...

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  19. How interesting that postcards began with no message area. So people were expected just to send a picture? Or were they meant just to collect?

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    1. Postal history is amazing!

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  20. Oh wow that's a great story. I didn't know it was originally against the law to write notes on the address side, that's really interesting! The album for postcards sounds a good idea too - I've actually been feeling inspired from your blog to start sending (and hopefully receiving) postcards more :) So I think I'll set up an album for them.

    Here's my "V" post :) http://nataliewestgate.com/2017/04/victim-secret-diary-of-a-serial-killer

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    1. I'm so glad to read that!

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Thank you for coming. All your comments make me extremely happy.