Welcome To The Postamúzeum!


This is a kind of guest post or a collaboration post, thanks to Ania. She made all these beautiful pictures (and more!).



I don't know the Postal Museum or Postamúzeum of Budapest (Hungary) in person. But Ania visited it and sent me a postcard from there. Not only a postcard, but a lot of wonderful photographs, information, links and her impressions. So, in a certain way, I feel as if I had been there myself...!


The museum is placed in a beautiful street among tall trees that create a truly magical atmosphere. It's a small museum, rather quiet, not so famous as it deserves. And last but not least: the staff is very kind!


There are lots of different things displayed in order to show the postal history of the country. The collection of objects started back in 1881.


And there are also many interactive things: you can use ancient phones and typing machines; you can sit in an old post van; there is a kind of tube that sends letters to another room; you can also try using a special lock on a bag with letters; there are also some small packages with addresses, and bags - and your task is to try and put packages to the right bags, judging by the postcode... That must be full of fun!


The building were the museum is located, Benczúr House, is also quite special. It was constructed as a three-storey residential building during the end of the 19th century. After the death of the first owner, Lajos Egyedi, the palace was acquired by the Hungarian-Italian Bank. Then in 1930 the Hungarian Royal Post Welfare Fund created there a clubhouse for its postal associations. That was more or less the use of the building (read more details here) until the early '90, when it become a high quality cultural centre.


In 2009 the founders decided the closure (and sale) of the palace. But luckily Hungarian Post purchased it and created the Postal Museum and Cultural Foundation in 2011.


The Postal Museum, occupying the second and third floor, has been welcoming visitors since 9th October 2012.


Be sure that will be a must if ever I visit Budapest!

8 comments:

  1. This is a great post - I am impressed that the museum allows photos - many do not. Those old phones and pipe system are incredible. Definitely signs of a bygone era.

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    1. I was last summer in the Postal Museum of Athens (http://goo.gl/GPfQma), and they allowed pictures too. In Spain it is very rare, too. Ania's pictures are very good, in my opinion!

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  2. Very lovely! I also read the history of the building on the linked website--interesting! :)

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    1. Many thanks, Christina! I also find this building very interesting.

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  3. The allowing of photos (or not) is the subject of much debate in the UK. The National Trust, which owns a lot of old buildings, has at last allowed it. But the National Trust for Scotland forbids it. How weird id that?

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    1. I can understand when objects in display are fragile. That's not a problem to me, I rarely take pictures inside the museums. But it's nice when they allow, especially if it is a postal museum... So I can publish on the blog!

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    2. I was really happy that we were allowed to take photos there (after paying for the photo pass of course ;)),
      but I think in such small museums, with so few visitors it's not a problem. In larger and more crowded museums I am usually rather irritated by people taking thousands of pictures.

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    3. You're right, Anna.

      As I told to him, I rarely take pictures in the museums. When I wish to take a picture, usually it is for remember something or because I really like that item. But I ask first if there is a postcard. Usually pictures are better (with the right light, etc.) and this is a way to support museums, especially the little ones. I don't like the 'I was here' pictures! :)

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Thank you for coming. All your comments make me extremely happy.